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November 13, 2004 Saturday

art
Rudy TV closing performance
2:00PM - 3:00PM
Price:  free
By popular demand, the Rudy TV collective (Joyce Rudinsky and Eric Niemi) will reprise their live perfomance version of NATURAL:SELECTION. In Creative Loafing (11/3/04), Felicia Feaster noted that "the videos build a case for vision as a constantly changing natural selection of its own, a case of choosing what and how to see."

In performance, NATURAL:SELECTION employs video projection, live performance and sound, and live video mixing to explore the human behaviors of conflict and competition through evolutionary terms. NATURAL:SELECTION creates an immersive environment where the viewers’ experience becomes the central element. The viewer is able to explore and investigate through a variety of perceptions – aural, visual, and spatial.

Rudy (www.ru-D.tv) is a media performance collective based in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Rudy was formed to create an interdisciplinary approach to art practice that worked within the contemporary convergence of art, entertainment, and information. Rudy investigates lived experience in an information-based society.


Also On This Day:

art
regular gallery hours
12:00PM - 5:00PM

music
Amaranth Signal / Magicicada
9:30PM - - -
Price:  $6
Amaranth Signal
Tennessee is well known for its cultural heritage throughout the nation and around the globe. Guitar pickers, banjo- and fiddle players, and of course vocal talents are everywhere, continuing the rich musical tradition. But the region also is home to an entirely new spin on music: A musical project named The Amaranth Signal.

A look at The Amaranth Signal instrument lineup reveals that synthesizers and computers, together with sophisticated software instruments have replaced the traditional orchestra. The three musicians perform with the help of analog modeling synthesizers, sequencers and audio filters. Each musical composition starts out from a planned structure. During a typical performance, new musical textures and patterns, as well as new instruments emerge. What’s really blowing the lid of traditional music is the ability to build entirely new instrument voices on the spot and to use them immediately. So what does it all sound like? First of all: even though the music may be computer-generated, it is still played predominantly by humans. Meandering sonic spaces unfold before the audience. A flying carpet, finely woven of technology and musical inspiration, takes performers and listeners to unknown destinations. The machines make their own musical contributions occasionally, drifting into entirely unexpected harmonies and out-of-this-world sounds.

The group’s name comes from the mythical flower Amaranth, which is said to bloom forever. Amaranth was also a staple in the diet of pre-Columbian Aztecs, who believed it had supernatural powers and incorporated it into their religious ceremonies. Besides having chosen the pre-Columbian name for the project, the three East Tennessee musicians represent the very cutting edge of today’s music. They are well connected with musicians in different parts of the world, but at the same time have never lost the connection to their immediate environment, to the valleys and hills, and to the simple but profound music of Appalachia.

Magicicada
...melodic beauty-a touch of violence-acoustic drones-collide-with live loops-found aounds-accidents- all reaching for the ecstatic transformation. Magicicada is the performance and recording life of Atlanta resident, Christopher White.
www.magicicada.com/

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